University of Wisconsin, Madison

The researchers found multiple enzymes that indicate causes of dysregulated adaptive immunity and tissue damage in fatal Ebola virus disease.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: three-dimensional chromosome structure, ovarian cancer immunopeptidome, and more.

A pair of surveys has gauged people's views toward gene editing, NPR reports.

Old Infections

Researchers have isolated Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Gardnerella vaginalis from an 800-year-old skeleton, New Historian reports.

The two studies were part of larger project aimed at building a complete map of mitochondrial function and associated proteins. 

At the National Center for Quantitative Biology of Complex Systems, scientists hope mass spec will drive new biological questions and vice versa.

Genome-wide association and other genetic studies hint at variants increasing subsequent neoplasm risk in individuals treated for cancer during childhood.

Universities and research institutes are making CRISPR/Cas9 more accessible than ever through new and existing core facilities.

The high-quality assembly contains clues to carotenoid pigment accumulation and past evolutionary events in the carrot-containing euasterid II clade.

Researchers find that a woman's genetic risk for age-related macular degeneration is influenced by lifestyle factors.

Pages

Researchers test gene therapy targeting a different cancer protein in a new trial, the New York Times reports.

Pennsylvania State University researchers found that salivary microRNAs could predict which kids would have longer concussion symptoms, according to NPR.

The Associated Press reports Alex Azar, the new Department of Health and Human Services secretary nominee, made millions of dollars as a pharmaceutical executive.

In PNAS this week: immune profiling of breast cancer, transposable element patterns in rice, and more.