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This Week in Cell

In Cell this week:  factors that regulate the differentiation of T helper type 2, structural variants teased out from long-read sequenced human genomes, and more.

At the Plant and Animal Genome conference, Daniel Promislow provided details on the longitudinal, open science effort, which is preparing to study up to 10,000 pet dogs.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: approach for mapping enhancers and their targets, comparative protein interaction analysis of dengue and Zika viruses, and more.

Researchers have engineered a plant that could help alleviate indoor air pollution, the Guardian reports.

Researchers found 253 candidate disease genes, based on 10,927 exomes from patients with autism spectrum disorder, developmental delay, or intellectual disability.

Exome sequencing led to gain-of-function mutations in the calcium voltage-gated channel gene CACNA1E in 30 developmental and epileptic encephalopathy cases.

The researchers said that uncovering a genetic mechanism behind the condition could aid in the development of new treatments.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetic loci tied to chronic back pain, genetic diversity of vampire bat-borne Bartonella bacteria, and more.

These three loci implicated skeletal and spinal cord development-linked pathways in chronic back pain.

The centers will generate genomic data from biosamples contributed by participants in the program and analyze data that will be returned to them.

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New results from the NASA Twins Study indicate that the immune system may rev up when in space, the Washington Post reports.

Kelvin Droegemeier, the new science advisor, spoke at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, Geekwire reports.

In PNAS this week: whole-genome assembly for the white shark, paper-based microfluidic method for detecting the malaria parasite, and more.

The World Health Organization has announced the members of its gene-editing committee, according to NPR.