University of Toronto

Researchers used exome capture RNA sequencing to come up with a collection of circRNAs in dozens of cancer types, including proposed prostate cancer markers.

The money is being provided under three Genome Canada funding competitions in partnership with the Canadian federal government and other groups.

In Genome Biology this week: gut microbiome study of individuals from Tanzania and Botswana, sixth version of the Network of Cancer Genes database, and more.

Researchers uncovered nearly a hundred loci to general risk tolerance and hundreds more to particular risky behaviors.

Research groups and companies are developing and applying tools to enrich for and capture CTCs to diagnose tumors early and monitor patients during treatment.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: similar variants seen in bullbogs, people with Robinow syndrome; ApoE genotypes in African-American, Puerto Rican populations; and more.

In Genome Research this week: a physical and genetic map of Cannabis sativa, evaluation of family- and population-based imputation tools, and more.

Investigators published an initial report on the method, which they call cfMeDIP-Seq, last week, and are now hoping to move to analysis of samples from longitudinal health studies.

The approach, called cfMeDIP-seq, could distinguish early-stage pancreatic cancer from healthy controls and differentiate several types of cancer.

In Genome Research this week: transcriptomic profiles of centenarians, role for PRDM9 expression in various tumor types, and more.

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The World Health Organization has announced the members of its gene-editing committee, according to NPR.

DARPA is working on developing algorithms that gauge the credibility of research findings, Wired reports.

The American Society of Breast Surgeons recommends all women diagnosed with breast cancer be offered genetic testing, the Washington Post says.

In Science this week: comparison of modern, historical rabbit exomes uncovers parallel evolution after myxoma virus exposure; and more.