University of Tokyo | GenomeWeb

University of Tokyo

The licenses cover IP related to a new CRISPR technology known as Cpf1, advanced forms of Cas9, and additional Cas9-based genome editing technologies.

Japanese researchers uncovered recurrent DUX4 fusions in adolescent or young adult cases of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, along with other new ALL fusions.

Filamentous fungi are used in a variety of industrial processes and genome editing could increase enzyme yield and efficiency. 

A trend towards more precise Cas9 activity promises spatial and temporal control over the nuclease and could reduce risky off-target activity in gene editing.

General Electric has been awarded

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Using a phylogenetic-based approach to study the genomes of more than a dozen mammals, University of Tokyo researchers found that African elephants have the largest number of characterized olfactory receptor genes.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A single gene appears to be the main culprit in a myeloid proliferation complication called transient abnormal myelopoiesis, or TAM, that's sometimes seen in individuals with Down syndrome, according to a study online yesterday in Nature Genetics, which used

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A pair of studies appearing in Nature Genetics yesterday reported on a number of variants linked to myeloma, including a variant located near a gene involved in telomere function and ones linked to the cohesin complex.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A Japanese team has published an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis focused on a form of kidney cancer called clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Shimadzu and the University of Tokyo today announced a collaboration to develop technologies aimed at lipidomic biomarkers.

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In Science this week: genetic target for urothelial bladder cancer treatment, and more.

At the Conversation, the University of Oxford's Michael Macklay writes that learning genetic risk of disease is a personal decision.

Two dozen scientific organizations have endorsed the March for Science, according to ScienceInsider.

Researchers in Japan describe a chimpanzee with a chromosomal abnormality similar to human Down syndrome, Mashable reports.