University of Tokyo

This Week in Science

In Science this week: paternally inherited cis-regulatory structural variants in autism, and more.

The researchers found multiple enzymes that indicate causes of dysregulated adaptive immunity and tissue damage in fatal Ebola virus disease.

Independent research teams took a look at the mutations, gene fusions, and other alterations that may inform pediatric T-ALL treatment and outcome predictions.

Mutation, structural variant, and expression data for up to three dozen TNBCs led to a subset of tumors with homologous recombination changes.

The licenses cover IP related to a new CRISPR technology known as Cpf1, advanced forms of Cas9, and additional Cas9-based genome editing technologies.

Japanese researchers uncovered recurrent DUX4 fusions in adolescent or young adult cases of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, along with other new ALL fusions.

Filamentous fungi are used in a variety of industrial processes and genome editing could increase enzyme yield and efficiency. 

A trend towards more precise Cas9 activity promises spatial and temporal control over the nuclease and could reduce risky off-target activity in gene editing.

General Electric has been awarded

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Using a phylogenetic-based approach to study the genomes of more than a dozen mammals, University of Tokyo researchers found that African elephants have the largest number of characterized olfactory receptor genes.

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The New York Times and ProPublica look into the close relationship between a startup and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Yahoo News reports millions of dollars are being transferred from NIH, CDC, and other programs to pay for the housing of detained undocumented immigrant children.

In Science this week: in vitro generation of human reproductive cells, and more.

Researchers gave a handful of octopuses MDMA to find that they too act more social on the drug, Gizmodo reports.