University of Pittsburgh

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: bacteriophage evolution varies based on host, lifestyle, and genetic factors; and more.

Through prospective pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma testing, researchers saw germline mutations in new genes and in cases outside of current germline testing criteria.

The researchers noted that the results "highlight the great potential of nanopore sequencing to analyze broad microbial community trends."

The organizations in the consortium will identify, characterize, and catalog human biological molecules affected by physical activity in volunteer biosamples.

Variant data for thousands of Europeans led to seven facial feature-associated sites in the genome, including loci near development or disease-related genes.

The prospective multi-site research study aims to determine the mutation prevalence of pancreatic cancer patients with a hereditary predisposition to the disease.

Gene expression patterns in nearly 150 post-mortem brain samples hinted at age-related changes to the circadian rhythm of transcripts in the human cortex.

Microarrays can detect smaller deletions in genes relevant to diseases like acute lymphoblastic leukemia, offering insight into diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

The institute, which has been a Comprehensive Cancer Center since 1990, also received a $25.6 million grant from NCI in conjunction with the renewal.

A trend towards more precise Cas9 activity promises spatial and temporal control over the nuclease and could reduce risky off-target activity in gene editing.

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Gene drives might run into biological resistance, the Economist reports.

Forensic experts exhumed painter Salvador Dalí's body to collect DNA for a paternity test, CBS News reports.

Yale Environment 360 writes that synthetic and conservation biologists aren't always on the same wavelength, but they are trying to reach an understanding.

In Science this week: full CRISPR locus integration complex structure, and more.