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University of Paris

In Science this week: global citizens' assembly on genome-editing technologies proposed, epigenetic markers predict metformin response, and more.

Researchers characterized more than 100 ancient equid samples stretching over some 9,000 years, spanning the early Neolithic Age to the Iron Age.

With data on almost 250 individuals, researchers saw shifting hunter-gatherer, Anatolian farmer, and Pontic steppe ancestry in French populations going back thousands of years.

Replacing nasopharyngeal swabs with saliva samples or nasal swabs could increase throughput and convenience, as well as relieve reagent and equipment shortages.

With exome sequences from more than 600 metastatic breast tumors, researchers identified genomic alterations related to tumor progression, treatment response, and patient outcomes.

The launch of the sequencing platforms is a milestone for the Plan France Médecine Génomique 2025, a €670 million initiative the French government announced two years ago.

The Rise of the Cat

Ancient DNA analysis gives insight into cat domestication and movements around the world.

Strategy Needed

An effort to develop a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-like university outside of Paris is faltering, according to Nature News.

Researchers plan to develop a device that supports nucleic acid sequencing and protein sequencing using plasmonic nanostructures.

Using data from more than 800 colorectal cancer samples, researchers concluded that features in the microenvironment may protect against metastasis.

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The US Food and Drug Administration is to announce stricter standards for emergency authorizations of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, reports the Washington Post.

The Associated Press reports Johnson & Johnson is starting a late-stage clinical trial of its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Bloomberg reports the budget of Operation Warp Speed is actually $18 billion, higher than the number typically cited.

In Genome Research this week: genomic analysis reveals role of super-spreaders in SARS-CoV-2, epigenetic drivers of cancer, and more.