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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford spinout will use its software to match genotypes and phenotypes in up to 500 genomes in a pilot study on clinical sequencing.

By examining haplotypes, Oxford University-led researchers studied how admixture and linked historical events have shaped the genetic landscape of West Eurasia.

In a paper in Nature Nanotechnology, the scientists demonstrate parallel measurements from many nanopores with single-base resolution, though not yet sequencing.

The CONVERGE consortium has found two loci, including one near a mitochondrial biogenesis gene, that are associated with major depressive disorder.

The partners received £30,000 (about $46,000) in funding from the BBSRC to support their metabolomics data-sharing and analyses activities.

In Nature this week: improved genome inference using population reference graph, and more.

Eisai will use Genomics' tools in its drug R&D efforts including for target selection, validation, and more.

Using samples from more than 2,000 people in the UK, an international team of researchers examined the pattern of genetic variation across the UK as well as continental European contributions to UK ancestry.

The consortium will address the major scientific challenges involving the productivity and sustainability of both natural and managed forests.

The grant will support a one-year pilot project to create a comprehensive map of human genetic variation for biomedical research.

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The New York City Police Department will be removing DNA profiles from a local database if they are from people who were never convicted of a crime, the New York Times reports.

Science reports that accusations of sexual assault against a microbiome researcher has also led to questions about his academic certifications.

Wired reports that researchers are analyzing the DNA fish leave behind in water to study their populations.

In Science this week: comprehensive cellular map of the human thymus, evidence of admixture between the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovan and a 'superarchaic' population.