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University of Oxford

Researchers from the University of Oxford and the University of Sydney sequenced numerous platypus genomes to study their population history.

A University of Oxford-led team combined imaging and genotyping data to find variants that affect how a person's facial profile or eyes look.

Tapping into genetic variation in the CETP gene, investigators explored blood lipid and disease effects of high-density cholesterol changes.

Participants in the pilot will begin developing the capabilities required for the planned data commons, including making data transparent and interoperable.

The British company has announced the results of two studies showcasing the ability of its EpiSwitch platform to diagnose and stage breast cancer and ALS patients.

Oxford researchers are turning to virtual reality to visualize genes and regulatory elements, Phys.org says.

Data from hundreds of individuals suggest that the country's populations are genetically diverse, with a long history of genetic isolation and differentiation.

Phylogenetic patterns for more than 2,200 dengue viruses collected in Asia over almost 60 years suggest air travel hubs have contributed to the virus' spread in the region.

TreeWAS provides a method for identifying gene variant-phenome associations in heterogenous biobank data without compromising phenotypic resolution.

Results from a set of new studies suggest Zika virus circulated undetected for long periods of time before producing infections described in recent outbreaks.

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According to Gizmodo, researchers have developed a list of a million nucleic acid-like polymers that could store genetic information.

An opinion piece in the Washington Post argues that golden rice could save the sight and lives of many children.

US National Institutes of Health has issued a new draft data-sharing policy, ScienceInsider reports.

In Cell this week: analysis of immune microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma, proteogenomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and more.