University of Muenster

Researchers in the US and Europe are implementing pathogen sequencing surveillance programs to track infectious diseases within hospitals.

Several groups who have sequenced and analyzed the E. coli outbreak strain and related genomes disagree on the evolutionary path that led to the strain responsible for more than 50 deaths.

According to Dag Harmsen, director of research at the University of Münster, the quick turnaround time of the instrument made it possible to obtain results within three days. "The biggest advantage [of the PGM] from my point of view as a public health official is that it's speedy, and speed is what is needed at the moment," he told In Sequence.

Though many details have yet to be worked out, the draft deal for the UK's withdrawal from the EU is giving researchers some hints for what they can expect, Nature News says.

DNA testing has solved a 100-year-old mystery contained in the skull and teeth samples of a now-extinct monkey that once inhabited Jamaica, Gizmodo reports.

As the UN ponders a ban on gene drives, one malaria researcher says there are less dramatic ways to fight the disease in Africa than unleashing GM mosquitoes on a whole continent.

In Nature this week: an improved reference genome of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, genomes of four species of truffles, and more.