University of Montreal

This Week in Science

In Science this week: sequencing of neuroblastomas uncovers alterations linked to prognosis, and more.

Researchers were able to identify 40 tumor-specific antigens within two mouse cancer cell lines and seven human primary tumors using this approach.

A meta-analysis of hundreds of thousands of individuals led to several dozen rare or low-frequency variants with relatively pronounced effects on height.

A phylogenetic analysis of gut microbial communities in the Inuit population revealed broad similarities to gut microbiomes from individuals in the city of Montreal.

With a newly sequenced genome for the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium kawagutii, researchers delved into the roots of coral reef endosymbiosis.

The sensor features a DNA-based steric hindrance method, and can detect the presence of antibodies in whole blood in less than 10 minutes.

Researchers from Canada and France identified rare, missense mutations in the POC5 gene in French Canadian families with idiopathic scoliosis.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – In Nature Genetics, Spanish researchers reported on the recombination events contributing to Legionella pneumophila outbreaks in Spain over more than a decade.

The results suggest that a large number of genes may be involved in schizophrenia, and could explain why previous linkage and genome-wide association studies have only been modestly successful.

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Researchers are refining a tool to predict a woman's risk of developing breast cancer, according to the Guardian.

According to Stat News, the partial government shutdown in the US could soon affect the ability of the Food and Drug Administration to review new drugs.

In PNAS this week: gypsy moth genome sequenced, phylogenomic analysis of Polyneopterans, and more.

CNN reports that people's genes tend to have a greater influence on their risk of developing disease than their environment, but it varies by phenotype.