University of Missouri

At the National Society of Genetic Counselors annual meeting, a number of clinicians said they conduct their own investigations of variants in clinical lab reports.

Researchers demonstrate the potential of CRISPR gene editing to prevent disease among livestock, Discover's D-brief blog reports.

California Institute of Technology's Frances Arnold was awarded half this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry, while the University of Missouri's George Smith and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology's Gregory Winter will split the other half.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: transcription levels linked to uracil mutations, transcriptomic analysis of medicinal leech, and more.

The team showed in a study this week that they could detect BRAF mutations in thyroid cancer, and believe the method could also allow blood-based early cancer detection.

Mizzou researcher Elizabeth King plans to use a fruit fly model to study how physiology and genetic makeup change over time in response to certain diets.

Precise Pigs

CRISPR-Cas9 offers possibility of "precision breeding" for livestock, Scientific American writes.

Lykoi cat

A University of Missouri-led team is delving into the genetics of a domestic shorthair cat breed known for its werewolf-like appearance.

Researchers have sequenced and analyzed more than 50 feral and domestic cats in search of genetic variants involved in specific physical features and forms of disease. 

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A team led by researchers from Washington University, Texas A&M University, and the University of Missouri has used comparative genomics to search for genetic signatures associated with biological and behavioral features found in the domestic cat, Felis silvestris c

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An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.