University of Melbourne

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: Tasmanian tiger genome sequence, and more.

Tasmanian tiger/thylacine/Tasmanian wolf

A genomic analysis of the Tasmanian tiger pointed to early genetic diversity declines in the species, while offering clues to convergent canid features.

A pair of researchers presents a new approach for gauging forensic Y-chromosome profile matches in PLOS Genetics.

Australian researchers call for carrier screening for cystic fibrosis, fragile X syndrome, and spinal muscular atrophy, Cosmos reports.

Using genome-wide association and targeted sequencing approaches, research teams continue to tally up genetic contributors and candidate genes in breast cancer.

In Genome Biology this week: computational approach for analyzing noisy single-cell sequencing profiles, eQTLs of dilated cardiomyopathy, and more.

The international team says its findings may explain the evolutionary reasons for the maintenance of coronary artery disease in human populations.

Researchers applied a SNP heritability model called LDAK to genetic data for a range of human traits, uncovering relatively high levels of variance explained by SNPs.

The partners will evaluate new biomarkers that they both find, and will assess the possibility for a preterm birth prognostic panel.

The technology involves analyzing susceptibility SNPs in order to predict a patient's likelihood of developing colorectal cancer.

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A new study in JAMA finds that genetic tests might not be able to determine what diet is right for someone seeking to lose weight.

A genome-wide association study that linked common genetic variants to salivary gland carcinoma risk has been retracted, according to Retraction Watch.

Vampire bats' ability to live off blood is etched in their genomes and gut microbiomes, the Scientist reports.

In Genome Biology this week: peopling of the Sahara, epigenetic reprogramming analysis of liverwort, and more.