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This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: genomic profile of an endosymbiotic microbe, role of horizontal gene transfer in fungal adaptations, and more.

The funding will enable the Institute for Genome Sciences to pursue a number of infectious disease research initiatives using omics technologies.

Researchers identified a handful of microbes associated with spontaneous preterm birth, and highlighted host immune protein levels with potential ties to the condition.

A new analysis pointed to a rise in over-generalized or incorrect bacterial identification by k-mer lowest common ancestor methods as the database has grown.

Using biorepository strains, researchers from the J. Craig Venter Institute and elsewhere profiled Zika virus consensus sequences, variant patterns, and phylogenetics.

The program was established to support the development and dissemination of functional genomic tools and techniques for genome manipulation in model organisms.

With genome sequences or genotyping profiles for 280 Native American and mestizo individuals, researchers explored population history and dynamics in Peru.

The roundworm Caenorhabditis briggsae lost thousands of genes, possibly in response to developing the ability to self-fertilize, the New York Times says.

Participants in the pilot will begin developing the capabilities required for the planned data commons, including making data transparent and interoperable.

The NIH has awarded $169 million this year to support 110 new projects in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative.

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The New York Times Magazine examines gender discrimination at the Salk Institute.

Science reports that MD Anderson Cancer Center has dismissed three researchers over foreign tie concerns.

A second death in gene therapy trial for type 1 spinal muscular atrophy is under investigation, according to Reuters.

In PLOS this week: antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli, a dozen genetic loci tied to varicose vein risk, and more.