University of Manchester

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: non-coding RNA function in yeast, transcriptomic profiles of malaria parasites, and more.

Analysis of ancient DNA from mummies known as the Two Brothers finds they are half-brothers, according to Science News.

An integrated analysis of 30 soil microbiome datasets suggests that common bacterial taxa may be less useful ecological indicators compared to much rarer taxa.

Clearer Risk

The Guardian reports that a new genetic risk test for breast cancer may give clearer risk estimates.

In a retrospective cohort study of Lynch syndrome patients, researchers found that cancer onset varied both by which gene was mutated and how it was altered.

A new analysis finds that collagen thought to have belonged to Tyrannosaurus rex was likely contamination, the International Business Times reports.

University of Manchester researchers describe their design for DNA computing, according to Popular Mechanics.

The circulating tumor cell-based classifier had an overall accuracy of 89 percent for small-cell lung cancer patients, the researchers reported.

The Stoller Biomarker Discovery Centre, funded by the UK's Medical Research Council, recently opened to develop mass spec-based research for varied diseases.

The company will use proceeds from the placement to conduct clinical trials on its Parsortix CTC system, which has been adopted by Cancer Research UK's Mancherster Institute.

Pages

A federal grand jury has indicted Elizabeth Holmes and Ramesh Balwani for alleged wire fraud in conjunction with their activities at Theranos.

Nature News reports that some developers are nervous about GitHub's acquisition by Microsoft.

A direct-to-consumer genetic testing company sent out used spit kits, CNBC reports.

In PLOS this week: comparison of commercial bisulfite kits, new method to predict essential proteins, and more