University of Kentucky

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomes of two organisms that regenerate body parts, sea lamprey genome, and more.

Salty Gene

Researchers report at the American Heart Association meeting that they've linked a gene variant to increased salt consumption.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The University of Kentucky is creating a biobank that will be a large, flexible resource that gathers samples from the patient population at the university hospital.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – In a study published online today in Science, researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder, the University of Kentucky at Lexington, and elsewhere described soil microbiome

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Institutes of Health has provided tens of millions of dollars in new funding to support three new Comprehensive Metabolomics Centers at Mayo Clinic, the University of Kentucky, and the University of Florida that will support metabolomics research in their

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The University of Kentucky plans to establish the UK Center for Regulatory and Environmental Analytical Metabolomics (UK-CREAM), and it has hired several metabolomics and cancer researchers from the University of Louisville to launch the program.

A pair of studies that used Illumina's EquineSNP50 BeadChip to investigate inbreeding in Thoroughbred horses and SNP misplacement in the horse genome map has been published in the June issue of Animal Genetics.

The NCRR funding will fund clinical and translational science centers and partnerships centered at five universities.

A collaboration funded by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation will study non-coding RNAs.

Pages

Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.