University of Guelph

The country's health minister said the research could help detect plant pests and mislabeled seafood, among other benefits.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – InstantLabs today announced an agreement with the University of Guelph to co-develop DNA-based tests to combat seafood species fraud, which is estimated to cost consumers and the food industry billions of dollars.

The project involves nine researchers at three universities who plan to produce a draft genome sequence for dry beans and to develop genetic markers for improved varieties of dry beans, especially disease-resistant beans.

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Steve Scherer, David Barker, Craig Venter, Lee Hood, Sujeevan Ratnasingham, Douglas Fambrough, Grant Campany

The researchers successfully amplified DNA from the "worm" in a bottle of mezcal by sampling straight from the alcohol and leaving the organism untouched.

The study aims to find biomarkers that will help produce more marketable pigs.

Genome Atlantic will work with industry to develop a fish that avoids developmental problems.

A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.