University of Groningen

This Week in Science

In Science this week: single-cell tools named Breakthrough of the Year winner, differences in gut microbiome composition and function in people with bowel disease, and more.

Research suggests gut microbe representation, abundance, and function may provide clues for diagnosing Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome.

With genome-wide association studies involving more than 200,000 individuals, researchers narrowed in on 58 loci and dozens of genes with ties to a chronic infection marker.

Using SNP profiles, gut microbe metagenomics, and other data, researchers identified host and microbe factors influencing circulating levels of CVD markers.

Using data from the UK Biobank, researchers explored relative contributions that genetics and lifestyle make to cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk.

Using data for nearly 59,000 UK Biobank participants, researchers identified genes and pathways involved in heart rate variability, exercise response, and exercise recovery.

The researchers found that genetically predicted increases in heart rate were associated with shortened lifespans.

Researchers identified some 1.9 million structural variants using whole-genome sequence data from 250 families profiled for the Genome of the Netherlands project.

Researchers demonstrated that Strand-seq directional single-cell sequencing can be used to assemble consensus chromosome haplotypes for an individual.

Researchers used single-cell sequencing to uncover karyotype heterogeneity within mouse and human cancers and predicted that it might be linked to outcomes.

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John Mendelsohn, a former president of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, has died, the New York Times reports.

Chinese state news agency Xinhua reports that a preliminary investigation has found He Jiankui performed his gene-editing work illegally.

Identical twins receive different estimates of ancestry from the same direct-to-consumer genetic testing firms, CBC reports.

In PNAS this week: chromosomal features of maize, adaptations in the vinous-throated parrotbill, and more.