University of Copenhagen

Using sequences from a 4,900-year-old Swedish gravesite, researchers identified a pathogenic form of Yersinia pestis circulating in Europe during the Neolithic Period.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: collection of epigenome-wide association study data, updated BloodSpot database, and more.

Three studies encompassing dozens of ancient genomes are offering a closer look at complex historical population spread in North, Central, and South America.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: host genetic variants affecting Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, differentially methylated regions in lung cancer, and more.

Participants aim to use predictive modeling to better understand epigenetic mechanisms, while encouraging the development of new technologies and therapies.

With NIPT samples from more than 141,000 women in China, investigators retraced population structure, historical migrations, genetic associations, and more.

Data for hundreds of thousands of participants led to 20 new risk loci for allergic rhinitis, which were further examined by functional annotation and fine mapping.

Independent research teams identified and sequenced hepatitis B strains going back thousands of years from samples in Europe, uncovering now-extinct lineages.

Using genome sequences for hundreds of ancient individuals, researchers have analyzed population dynamics and displacements around the Eurasian steppe.

Researchers have sequenced samples from ancient toilets to study past eating habits and health, NPR reports.

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The data generated by 100,000 Genomes Project is being housed on military servers due to attacks by hackers, Naked Security reports.

A new poll finds most US adults are not familiar with personalized medicine, according to HealthDay.

Vox reports that the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity decided against a gene drive moratorium.

In Science this week: sequencing of neuroblastomas uncovers alterations linked to prognosis, and more.