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In Nature this week: reference genomes for the platypus and echidna, single-cell RNA sequencing analysis of gastric adenocarcinoma, and more.

Plans are underway to add genomics data from various Danish cohorts to the browser, which will provide greater insight into disease progression.

New Scientist reports that a new genetic analysis suggests some saber-toothed cats may have lived in packs and been fast runners.

In Nature this week: MassIVE.quant resource houses mass spectrometry-based proteomic data, influence of Viking genetics on European populations, and more.

Researchers studied the genetic structure of Viking Age Scandinavian populations, along with migrations and the adoption of Viking culture by non-Scandinavians.

In Science this week: researchers recover near-complete smallpox virus genomes from Viking Age-individuals, and more.

Researchers used sequence data from variola virus strains in 11 "Viking Age" individuals from northern Europe to gain new clues about smallpox evolution.

Ancient samples from more than a dozen archaeological sites suggests population movement from South America preceded by at least two earlier migration waves.

Independent research teams have tackled the genetic history of the Levant, Anatolia, and other parts of the Near East to retrace population movement and mixing since the Bronze Age.

Protein profiling on ancient dental enamel samples suggests Homo antecessor was part of a lineage that split from that leading to modern humans and Neanderthals.

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The Wall Street Journal reports on gaps in COVID-19 testing affecting less affluent urban areas and rural locations.

According to NBC News, new SARS-CoV-2 variants are making it harder for researchers to model the course of the pandemic.

The New York Times reports that experts say President Joe Biden's goal of vaccinating 1 million people a day in the US in the next 100 days is too low a bar.

In Science this week: single-cell lineage tracing technique applied to study lung cancer metastasis, and more.