University College London

A University College London professor calls for more genetic research on more ethnically diverse populations, according to the Guardian.

The WGS workflow for diagnosing pediatric genetic diseases uses off-the-shelf products and fits into standard diagnostic laboratory procedures.

Researchers identified rare, functionally disruptive variants in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN4A in a small subset of SIDS cases.

In Genome Biology this week: transcription factor use among brittle stars, single-cell RNA sequencing strategy, and more.

The Epigenetics For Female Personalised Cancer Care (EpiFemCare) project recently published its findings in two papers in the journal Genome Medicine.

The model aims to uncover stroke patients at high, medium, or low risk of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which is linked to additional strokes or dementia.

Based on their genome-wide association study, investigators argued that the dementia condition is not simply an extension of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease.

The team said that by understanding why some members of this family don't feel pain, they could unearth new drug targets to treat others with chronic pain.

The Philosopher's DNA

The Telegraph reports that philosopher Jeremy Bentham is to have his DNA tested.

With new gene sequencing panels, investigators made firm or possible diagnoses in almost one-third of undiagnosed autoinflammation and vasculitis cases.

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Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released the results of a genetic ancestry analysis, the Boston Globe reports.

Retraction Watch's Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus report that Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital have recommended that more than 30 papers from a former researcher be retracted.

Thomas Steitz, who won the 2009 chemistry Nobel Prize for his ribosome work, has died, the Washington Post reports.

In PLOS this week: mechanisms for genes implicated in coronary artery disease, rumen microbes and host genetics influence cow methane production, and more.