University College Dublin

Having recently been awarded a key US patent, Irish molecular diagnostics shop HiberGene hopes to commercialize its first assay — a loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based test for meningococcal meningitis — in Europe by the end of this year, CEO Tony Hill told PCR Insid

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – University College Dublin and biomedical outsource development firm ICON have struck a partnership under which ICON will support a genomics fellowship, a science center, and research programs at UCD, the company said today.

University College Dublin of Dublin, Ireland, has received US Patent No. 8,116,551, "Method and system for image analysis." A method for determining the level of expression of objects of interest using an automated image analysis system is claimed.

The contract runs for two years, with an option to be extended for a third year, and is worth at least $490,000 per year.

The Newman Fellowship will support a researcher studying proteomics research strategies for an array of projects.

The University College Dublin center also is supported by Agilent, Protagen, Siemens, and other firms.

About 60 percent of NovaUCD's tech-transfer activity last year was in the life sciences. The program has also benefitted from a portion of a €30 million initiative launched by the Irish government in 2007 to boost tech transfer at the country's research institutions.

Looking to support local industry and nurture Ireland's economic recovery, University College Dublin and Trinity College Dublin will combine their existing programs in tech transfer, enterprise development, industry relations, and post-graduate entrepreneurial education, largely in the area of life sciences.

Informatics for the Other 'Omic

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While the datasets are dwarfed by comparison to those of genomics and proteomics, metabolomics has challenges all its own. Leaders from the forefront of informatics development for this field sound off on the current status of small molecule informatics and database development, and where they need to go.

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The Washington Post reports on a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan to place rapid DNA analyzers at booking stations around the country.

In an editorial, officials from scientific societies in the US and China call for the international community to develop criteria and standards for human germline editing.

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

In Science this week: the PsychENCODE Consortium reports on the molecular mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders, and more.