University College Dublin

Long Lives of Bats

Researchers report that the telomeres of a long-lived bat don't shorten with age.

A new study stratified the Irish population into 10 genetic clusters that largely line up with geographic and political boundaries.

Researchers plan to sequence 5,000 genomes and collect health and fitness data to tease out the role of genetics in things like aerobic capacity and bone density.

The Irish Times looks into whether everyone benefits the same from advice to exercise and eat right.

The work offers a proof of concept for the notion that dynamic models of signaling could serve as more effective biomarkers than discrete molecular markers.

Using 230 ancient genomes, researchers have identified source populations for early European farmers and uncovered signs of selection associated with the transition to this lifestyle.

A team of Irish researchers sequenced an ancient aurochs genome to examine the domestication of cattle.

Retrogenix has tapped Matthew Britz to be its North American business development director. Britz will operate out of the UK firm's newly established US office in Cambridge, Mass.

Having recently been awarded a key US patent, Irish molecular diagnostics shop HiberGene hopes to commercialize its first assay — a loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based test for meningococcal meningitis — in Europe by the end of this year, CEO Tony Hill told PCR Insid

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – University College Dublin and biomedical outsource development firm ICON have struck a partnership under which ICON will support a genomics fellowship, a science center, and research programs at UCD, the company said today.

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A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.