University of Chicago

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: genetic hints of adaptive evolution in Atlantic herring, ancestry of ancient individuals from the Pacific Northwest, and more.

Using monogenic diabetes registry examples, a University of Chicago researcher argued that appropriate genetic testing is needed to detect monogenic diabetes.

Data generated through the collaboration will be used to predict how breast cancer patients will respond to treatment.

The system, developed in 2007 as an online portal to access hardware and software for automated metagenome analysis, has strained to meet user demand.

The update includes several key initiatives such as a liquid biopsy database, a DoD-led longitudinal study, and NCI cloud collaborations with Amazon and Microsoft.

The newly minted company offers panel, whole-genome and whole exome sequencing, as well as bioinformatics analysis and reporting services to oncologists.

The large-scale study is designed to advance personalized medicine for pancreatic cancer to help meet the organization's goal of doubling patient survival rates by 2020.

Clinicians and genetic counselors are coming up with triage strategies for cancer cases in which medically actionable germline mutations are suspected.

A comparative genomics study suggests ants with obligate mutualist relationships to plants may have higher rates of molecular evolution than generalist ants.

The agency said researchers from around the world will have the capacity to review and submit cancer patients' genomic and clinical data.

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Vivek Murthy is no longer the surgeon general of the US, the Associated Press reports.

People around the globe took to the streets to support science — some with signs.

Parents who learn of their increased genetic risk of disease also contend with telling their children about theirs, the New York Times writes.

In PLOS this week: loci linked to body mass index measurements, long non-coding RNA expression and urothelial carcinoma prognosis, and more.