University of Chicago

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic ancestry analysis of Sardinians, current noncoding mutations in colorectal cancer, and more.

In the Skin

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

A University of Chicago-led team examined the genomes of more than 3,500 Sardinians and found within-island genetic substructure and outside admixture.

Using proteomic and genetic approaches, researchers identified a histone mark called lysine benzoylation that appears to be enhanced by exposure to sodium benzoate.

Researchers screened 2,000 Nigerian women with and without the disease for loss-of-function mutations in 25 known and suspected breast cancer genes.

Elephants may have "re-animated" a pseudogene to help stave off cancer, according to the New York Times.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetic architecture mediating gene expression, metabolomic patterns in multiple myeloma, and more.

No Test Needed

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.

Molecular analysis of metastatic CRC in the liver has identified three molecular subtypes that can be coupled with clinical risk scores to inform patient risk.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetic drift influences diversity among pathogens, QTLs linked to benzimidazole sensitivity, and more.

Pages

The US National Science Foundation's new sexual harassment policy is to go into effect next month, according to Nature News.

Researchers report using genotyping to tie together illegal ivory shipments and trace them back to a handful of cartels, the New York Times reports.

Researchers find that historical factors influence which genes are the most highly studied, the Atlantic reports.

In Nature this week: genomic ancestry analysis of Sardinians, current noncoding mutations in colorectal cancer, and more.