University of Cambridge

Dunno What Those Do

New Scientist reports that 20 percent of human and yeast proteins are uncharacterized.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: comparison of modern, historical rabbit exomes uncovers parallel evolution after myxoma virus exposure; and more.

Many variants that became more prevalent in different rabbit populations after viral exposure were associated with immune system functions, a new study suggests.

On Butterfly Wings

A genetic analysis finds that three genomic regions influence mate choice in two Heliconius butterfly species, as Smithsonian magazine reports.

With sequence data for 551 esophageal adenocarcinomas, researchers uncovered potential prognostic alterations and mutations that may sensitize tumors to treatment.

The firm's lab subsidiary Phenogen will provide genotyping to study the impact on women's decisions to undergo prophylactic surgery.

Researchers saw variants contributing to both ends of the weight spectrum by analyzing thousands of thin, early-onset obese, and population control individuals.

Researchers are refining a tool to predict a woman's risk of developing breast cancer, according to the Guardian.

A GWAS meta-analysis involving 10,074 PCOS cases revealed three new and 11 known risk loci, along with a relatively consistent genetic architecture among cases.

Researchers have identified promising polygenic risk scores for estimating overall breast cancer risk as well as estrogen receptor-positive forms of disease.

Pages

Thermo Fisher Scientific says it will no longer sell machines in China's Xinjiang region, according to the Wall Street Journal.

New Scientist reports that 20 percent of human and yeast proteins are uncharacterized.

The University of Zurich's Ruedi Aebersold and his colleagues analyzed a dozen HeLa cell lines to find differences in gene expression, protein levels, and more.

In Nature this week: protein-coding variants associated with body-fat distribution, and more.