UNC

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: computational pipeline to find alternative transcription start sites, search for pathogenic mutations in Coats plus syndrome, and more.

Fresh Take on Ras

NPR reports on new work to find drugs to target the RAS cancer gene.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: gene expression signatures in mouse breast cancer models, RNA sequencing study of Kaposi's sarcoma, and more.

The study will provide no-cost tumor sequencing and clinical trial matching to an estimated 100,000 patients with advanced cancers.

At HudsonAlpha's Genomic Medicine Conference University of North Carolina's Anya Prince discussed insurance coverage of genetic tests and preventive care.

The method sequences DNA fragments cut out of the genome during excision repair, then maps them back onto the genome to find the repair location.

Led by former LabCorp executives, the firm is aiming to develop evidence around genetic signatures and license the tech to labs and Dx developers.

Researchers from the University of North Carolina's department of obstetrics and school of medicine have published a report on the center's first year offering non-invasive prenatal fetal aneuploidy tests from both Illumina-owned Verinata Health and Sequenom.

This is the fourth in a series of profiles of centers awarded grants this year by the NIH under the Genomic Sequencing and Newborn Screening Disorders research program.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A group of federal, academic, and industry partners in the US have launched a new challenge to spur the development of new computational tools for predicting patient responses to certain drugs and chemicals based on their genomes, Sage Bionetworks said today.

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Researchers describe a way to share data while keeping it secure, Agence France Presse reports.

In Science this week: genetic mutations typically associated with esophageal cancer are common in older, healthy individuals, and more.

India's Council of Scientific and Industrial Research has a new director-general, according to ScienceInsider.

A new study links more than a hundred genes to autism spectrum disorder, Discover's D-brief blog reports.