UNC

The approach could allow doctors to more accurately and more easily identify which patients are free from cancer after radiation treatment.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: computational pipeline to find alternative transcription start sites, search for pathogenic mutations in Coats plus syndrome, and more.

Fresh Take on Ras

NPR reports on new work to find drugs to target the RAS cancer gene.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: gene expression signatures in mouse breast cancer models, RNA sequencing study of Kaposi's sarcoma, and more.

The study will provide no-cost tumor sequencing and clinical trial matching to an estimated 100,000 patients with advanced cancers.

At HudsonAlpha's Genomic Medicine Conference University of North Carolina's Anya Prince discussed insurance coverage of genetic tests and preventive care.

The method sequences DNA fragments cut out of the genome during excision repair, then maps them back onto the genome to find the repair location.

Led by former LabCorp executives, the firm is aiming to develop evidence around genetic signatures and license the tech to labs and Dx developers.

Researchers from the University of North Carolina's department of obstetrics and school of medicine have published a report on the center's first year offering non-invasive prenatal fetal aneuploidy tests from both Illumina-owned Verinata Health and Sequenom.

This is the fourth in a series of profiles of centers awarded grants this year by the NIH under the Genomic Sequencing and Newborn Screening Disorders research program.

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An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.