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As part of its request for dismissal, MIT admitted no wrongdoing, but agreed to be bound by any court ruling against the case's other defendants, the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

The matter is of particular importance since UMass is the only one of the four organizations to which the IP is assigned to have licensed it to companies other than Alnylam.

Although the suit was first filed last summer, the courtroom showdown had been brewing for years.

The suit, filed by Alnylam and Max Planck against the University of Massachusetts, MIT, and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, is set to go to trial Feb. 22.

Conditions that will be a focus of the deal include age-related macular degeneration, RXi said.

"I've been absolutely blown away by the microRNA field and the way it's blossomed," University of Massachusetts Medical School researcher and Nobel laureate Craig Mello said. "There is just one story after another [showing that] microRNAs … are very critical to many aspects of either disease or development."

The RTI hopes to create synergies between investigators focused on basic science researchers and those oriented towards the clinic by putting them in the same space. At the same time, the institute aims to foster research that encompasses all RNA-related pathways, not just RNAi.

Russian and American researchers reported today that Alexei and Anastasia Romanov carried a mutation in the blood coagulation factor gene F9 that causes hemophilia B, or "Christmas disease."

While the funding will directly benefit UMMS researcher Michael Czech, it is also expected to be a boon for RXi Pharmaceuticals, which Czech co-founded, since the company holds an exclusive license to the delivery technology for therapeutic RNAi applications.

The USPTO said that since the co-assignees of the Tuschl-I IP “have divergent interests, no one side can reasonably expect or be permitted to control the prosecution of [the] patent application [at issue] to the exclusion of the others.”

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The US National Institutes of Health's All of Us project awarded $4.6 million to the company Color to develop a genetic counseling resource for the program.

The Times of India reports on a pilot study that used genomic testing to determine whether patients had drug-resistant tuberculosis.

New guidelines say that more women may benefit from genetic testing for hereditary breast or ovarian cancer, according to the Los Angeles Times.

In Cell this week: small proteins identified among human microbiome, role for tumor microbes in pancreatic cancer survival, and more.