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This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: mouse model of genetically induced emphysema, gene expression signatures of circulating melanoma cells, and more.

The consortium aims to identify tuberculosis protein targets and corresponding small molecule inhibitors that can be used to develop drugs to shorten therapy duration.

The team aims to release the new resource sometime next year, with the hope that it will become as widely used as other institute databases.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: host-microbe interactions and cancer drug response; links between transcription rate, mRNA translation, and methylation; and more.

The funding will, in part, support efforts to expand the project's catalog of functional elements and understand their roles in different contexts.

The Ebola virus may have mutated to better infect humans during the 2014 outbreak, the New York Times reports.

The healthcare provider organizations are tasked with managing patient enrollment in the Precision Medicine Initiative.

Tufts scientists and their colleagues called for steps to ensure that disadvantaged groups benefit from genetically based diagnoses and treatments.

The researchers particularly highlighted C21orf2 and NEK1, which are involved in cilial and mitochondrial function.

A study of gut microbes in infants with or without necrotizing enterocolitis points to a uropathogenic Escherichia coli association in infected preterm infants

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US National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins says he will avoid male-only speaker panels.

Two patients fell ill, and one subsequently died, following a fecal microbiome transplant that harbored multi-drug-resistant bacteria, according to the New York Times.

Technology Review reports that eGenesis is testing whether organs from genetically modified pigs can be transplanted into monkeys.

In Science this week: almond reference genome, and more.