UK Biobank

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of Aspergillus, atlas of genetic associations in the UK Biobank, and more.

Researchers documented genetic associations, trait heritability, and more with data from GWAS on 778 binary or non-binary traits in UK Biobank participants.

The phenome-wide association study focused on SNPs near potential drug target sites with ties to one or more phenotypes that might impact target suitability.

The UK Biobank has collected genotyping, medical, and other phenotypic data on nearly 500,000 individuals, which it says will fuel additional studies.

Genes and pathways related to mesenchymal biology, connective tissue, and conditions like obesity came to the forefront when researchers analyzed the new susceptibility loci.

To explore the genetic basis of clonal hematopoiesis and its consequences, researchers analyzed genotyping data for more than 151,000 UK Biobank participants.

The project will focus on metabolic biomarkers that previous research has linked to heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and other common chronic diseases.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and its collaborators plan to sequence the exomes all of the UK Biobank participants by then end of 2019.

Still Evolving

A new paper in PNAS finds that people are still evolving, but with increased pressure on weight and decreased pressure on intelligence.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

Since 2015, the Regeneron Genetics Center has sequenced 250,000 exomes from phenotyped individuals, identifying "human knockouts" and other large-effect mutations.

Pages

The United Nations is to consider a ban on field testing gene drives at a meeting being held next week, Technology Review reports.

The Associated Press reports that gene-edited food may soon be for sale.

The US Department of Health and Human Services is beginning a series of meetings on human fetal tissue research, Stat News reports.

In Cell this week: epigenetic change linked to glioblastomas, rare and low-frequency variants contributing to multiple sclerosis risk, and more.