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UC Berkeley

In February, the USPTO's Patent Trial and Appeal Board stopped UC's bid for IP underpinning the most lucrative applications of genome editing.

The researchers used this approach to show how non-coding variation associated with human immune dysfunction alters context-specific gene programs. 

Doudna will get $2.1 million to set up the Center for Genome Editing and Recording, and Zhang will get $1.1 million to develop tools for RNA interrogation.

Prize for Five

Five researchers are to share this year's Albany Medical Center Prize for their work on the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing tool, the AP reports.

In PNAS this week: de novo mutations contribute to non-syndromic craniosynostosis, fungal tree of life, and more.

Researchers led by Jennifer Doudna found that the architecture of the Cas1-Cas2 integrase contributes to bacterial adaptive immunity.

A new study led by UC-Berkeley scientists shows that an inhibitor protein from a Listeria bacteriophage can block Cas9 from interacting with DNA.

Berkeley researchers described variants of the Cas13a CRISPR protein that could allow for simultaneous detection of two different RNA molecules.

Reinstating the CRISPR patent interference with the Broad Institute would allow UC to argue that Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier invented it first.

The program will provide two young scientists with funding for independent research as well as resources to help them commercialize their technology.

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Politico notes that the Biden Administration has not yet nominated a permanent Food and Drug Administration commissioner. 

Anthony Fauci also informed the World Health Organization executive board that the US would be joining the COVAX initiative, according to CNBC.

A new preprint suggests some SARS-CoV-2 variants could affect the effectiveness of current vaccines, the Associated Press reports.

In Nature this week: Australian lungfish provides details on the movement of vertebrate life from water to land, and more.