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The company will use the funding to expand its gene editing systems for potential therapeutic use, and to advance research and validation for its pipeline.

CRISPR Chemistry Win

Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna have won this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work developing the CRISPR gene editing tool, according to Reuters.

The newly public company has attracted attention from both investors and competitors for its technology platform used in antibody discovery workflows.

The funding will allow the company to accelerate development of its DNA synthesis technology, hire staff, build an R&D facility, and establish industrial partnerships.

The ruling is the latest decision in the fight between the Broad and the University of California for control over the bulk of the IP rights to CRISPR-Cas9.

The company has taken an exclusive license to the Casɸ proteins and is working to characterize their capabilities to determine how they can best be used.

Exome sequencing had lower sensitivity and specificity for finding inborn errors of metabolism than conventional screening, but appeared to refine mass spec-based results.

In Science this week: chromatin accessibility of microglia during fetal development, and more.

In Science this week: model to predict coral bleaching, and more.

The CasΦ nuclease, which was first discovered in February, is one of the most compact CRISPR proteins ever found, and is active in both human and plant cells.

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Russia says its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine has a very high efficacy rate in an initial analysis of clinical trial data, according to the Financial Times.

Wired reports on a microbial analysis of sketches drawn by Leonardo DaVinci.

A new survey explores coronavirus vaccine hesitancy among Black and Latino individuals, the Washington Post reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: the Aging Atlas database, a database of human metagenome-related metadata, and more.