UC Berkeley

Prize for Five

Five researchers are to share this year's Albany Medical Center Prize for their work on the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing tool, the AP reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: de novo mutations contribute to non-syndromic craniosynostosis, fungal tree of life, and more.

Researchers led by Jennifer Doudna found that the architecture of the Cas1-Cas2 integrase contributes to bacterial adaptive immunity.

A new study led by UC-Berkeley scientists shows that an inhibitor protein from a Listeria bacteriophage can block Cas9 from interacting with DNA.

Berkeley researchers described variants of the Cas13a CRISPR protein that could allow for simultaneous detection of two different RNA molecules.

Reinstating the CRISPR patent interference with the Broad Institute would allow UC to argue that Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier invented it first.

The program will provide two young scientists with funding for independent research as well as resources to help them commercialize their technology.

These tardigrade-specific proteins form a disordered, glass-like solid structure and could be used to help transport pharmaceuticals.

Woolly mammoths

A mammoth from Wrangel Island that was alive close to the time the species went extinct showed signs of genomic deterioration compared with an older mammoth.

UC can still salvage its CRISPR IP rights after last week's decision, but a long-shot appeal in federal court is the only possibility for total victory.

Pages

Jay Shendure and his colleagues have developed a new method to more comprehensively identify human cell types, the NY Times reports.

Researchers in the UK and Japan have shown that infertility in mice with three sex chromosomes can be overcome, according to the Guardian.

China is embracing preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Nature News reports. 

In PLOS this week: host genetic factors associated with cervical neoplasia progression, population patterns for an ancient flowering rainforest plant, and more.