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This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: ancient British genomes highlight influence of migration, and more.

Two teams sequenced the genomes of 20 individuals who lived in Iron Age, Roman-era, or Anglo-Saxon Britain to examine the population history of the region.

The genetic evidence supports a link between migrations and important cultural shifts like the emergence of agriculture or metal tools occurring in parallel.

Researchers report on the genomes of two ancient hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus.

Researchers used whole-genome sequencing to assess relapse, re-infection, and patient-to-patient transmission patterns in patients with multiple C. difficile infections at an Irish hospital.

A new study shows how NGS could help researchers retrace the history of livestock agriculture by sequencing DNA found in parchment.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – De novo mutations linked to schizophrenia are over-represented in chromatin remodeling genes, researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Trinity College Dublin repo

The contract runs for two years, with an option to be extended for a third year, and is worth at least $490,000 per year.

Trinity College Dublin's Institute of Molecular Medicine has opened a Genome Sequencing Laboratory.

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The Wall Street Journal reports that National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins' response to contamination concerns at the agency might have delayed care.

The final revision of the Common Rule doesn't include the proposed change requiring consent for leftover biospecimens.

The first Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology papers show mixed results.

In Nature this week: mobile phone-based targeted DNA sequencing, and more.