Trinity College

Goat kid.

Researchers sequenced mitochondrial and/or nuclear genomes for dozens of wild and domestic ancient goats to explore domestication and selection patterns.

Using data from 1,000 Irish individuals, a Trinity College Dublin-led team uncovered nearly two dozen discrete genetic clusters.

Living DNA and its partners are aiming to create a detailed genetic map of the world based on people's DNA.

The transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural lifestyles seems to have spread to the Baltics without massive migration from Anatolia or the Levant.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: ancient British genomes highlight influence of migration, and more.

Two teams sequenced the genomes of 20 individuals who lived in Iron Age, Roman-era, or Anglo-Saxon Britain to examine the population history of the region.

The genetic evidence supports a link between migrations and important cultural shifts like the emergence of agriculture or metal tools occurring in parallel.

Researchers report on the genomes of two ancient hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus.

Researchers used whole-genome sequencing to assess relapse, re-infection, and patient-to-patient transmission patterns in patients with multiple C. difficile infections at an Irish hospital.

A new study shows how NGS could help researchers retrace the history of livestock agriculture by sequencing DNA found in parchment.

Pages

The New York Times and ProPublica say that many physicians fail to disclose their financial ties when publishing in medical journals.

The Wall Street Journal reports Human Longevity's valuation has dropped by 80 percent.

Science reports that the US National Cancer Institute is cutting its operating budget by 5 percent.

In PLOS this week: similar variants seen in bullbogs, people with Robinow syndrome; ApoE genotypes in African-American, Puerto Rican populations; and more.