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Trinity College

Goat kid.

Researchers sequenced mitochondrial and/or nuclear genomes for dozens of wild and domestic ancient goats to explore domestication and selection patterns.

Using data from 1,000 Irish individuals, a Trinity College Dublin-led team uncovered nearly two dozen discrete genetic clusters.

Living DNA and its partners are aiming to create a detailed genetic map of the world based on people's DNA.

The transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural lifestyles seems to have spread to the Baltics without massive migration from Anatolia or the Levant.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: ancient British genomes highlight influence of migration, and more.

Two teams sequenced the genomes of 20 individuals who lived in Iron Age, Roman-era, or Anglo-Saxon Britain to examine the population history of the region.

The genetic evidence supports a link between migrations and important cultural shifts like the emergence of agriculture or metal tools occurring in parallel.

Researchers report on the genomes of two ancient hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus.

Researchers used whole-genome sequencing to assess relapse, re-infection, and patient-to-patient transmission patterns in patients with multiple C. difficile infections at an Irish hospital.

A new study shows how NGS could help researchers retrace the history of livestock agriculture by sequencing DNA found in parchment.

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Wired reports on how genetic genealogy's use in forensics has exploded in the year since an arrest in the Golden State Killer case was made.

New York City has settled with a forensic scientist who was fired after questioning a DNA testing approach used by the medical examiner's office, the New York Times reports.

Retraction Watch reports that the increase in retracted papers at a journal is due to more resources there to tackle publication ethics.

In Nature this week: technique for measuring replication fork movement, WINTHER trial results, and more.