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Patent Watch: Mar 13, 2009

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Stanford University, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, PerkinElmer Cellular Technologies Germany Awarded US Patents

IP Roundup: Mar 10, 2009

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Accelr8, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Stanford University, Aperio Technologies

Quake confirmed in an e-mail message last week that he used a Helicos sequencer for the project and said that he plans to publish the results of the study.

NHLBI in late January put out an RFP for the program, which calls for researchers to develop proteomics technologies and apply them to solve clinical puzzles. It is set to begin early next year, shortly after its current two major proteomics initiatives expire.

The deal brings to six the number of academic institutions from which Fate has licensed IP related to using small molecules to induce pluripotency in stem cells for therapeutic effect, drug discovery, and matched cell-replacement therapies.

People Transfer: Mar 4, 2009

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Fate Therapeutics names Dan Shoemaker as CTO

Genentech developed Unison to reduce the amount of time researchers spent on data preparation prior to bioinformatics analysis. Recognizing that many scientists outside the company are grappling with the same issues, they decided to release the system under the open-source Academic Free License.

Patent Watch: Feb 27, 2009

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Applera, and Stanford University Awarded US Patents

The panel of proteomics experts told attendees of the annual meeting of the US Human Proteome Organization that the science is not ready for clinical use and the discipline has become marginalized compared to genomics.

Some researchers, like Ruedi Aebersold, claim that because tools such as mass specs are in a "perpetual discovery mode, the high-performance application of the [the tools] will remain in specialized labs."

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Gene editing could be an issue competitive sports need to address soon, four researchers from Arizona State University write at Slate.

A genetic alteration appears to increase heart failure risk among people of African descent, according to the Washington Post.

In his look back at the past decade, BuzzFeed News' Peter Aldhous writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing has led to "Facebook for genes."

In Nature this week: genetic "clock" that can predict the lifespans of vertebrates, new assembler called wtdbg2, and more.