Stanford

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic factors that influence glioblastoma response to anti-PD-1 therapy, sequencing test for infectious disease, and more.

Who Knew What When?

Technology Review reports that Stanford University is investigating what its faculty members knew about He Jiankui's effort to edit the genomes of human embryos.

Researchers identified 20 genes with enhanced or muted expression in blood samples from dengue virus cases that progress to hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome.

In a new policy paper, investigators outlined existing challenges to public data sharing and touted the benefits of increasing openness before and after publication.

Silicon Valley Startup Jungla has a 10-year vision of its founders to improve large-scale correlation of mutations and disease.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of the invasive fall webworm, amp of constrained coding regions within the human genome, and more.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.

Perceived genetic risk can affect individuals' physiology more than their actual genetic risk, raising questions about when to disclose such information.

A new analysis finds increased transparency regarding conflicts of interest and funding in recent biomedical journal articles, Nature News reports.

Prospective research suggests DNA and RNA sequencing can reveal pathogen, microbiome, and host expression features to detect lower respiratory tract infections.

Pages

The World Health Organization has announced the members of its gene-editing committee, according to NPR.

DARPA is working on developing algorithms that gauge the credibility of research findings, Wired reports.

The American Society of Breast Surgeons recommends all women diagnosed with breast cancer be offered genetic testing, the Washington Post says.

In Science this week: comparison of modern, historical rabbit exomes uncovers parallel evolution after myxoma virus exposure; and more.