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This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of the invasive fall webworm, amp of constrained coding regions within the human genome, and more.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.

Perceived genetic risk can affect individuals' physiology more than their actual genetic risk, raising questions about when to disclose such information.

A new analysis finds increased transparency regarding conflicts of interest and funding in recent biomedical journal articles, Nature News reports.

Prospective research suggests DNA and RNA sequencing can reveal pathogen, microbiome, and host expression features to detect lower respiratory tract infections.

Researchers saw changes in gut microbial community membership as populations moved from foraging to short-term or long-term agriculture.

The projects are organized by the Eliminate Cancer Initiative, the National Brain Tumor Society, and the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation.

Stanford University's Michael Snyder found that methylome shifts preceded spikes in his blood glucose levels, suggesting profiling could detect disease.

Researchers have uncovered two key genes for deer antler formation, the New York Times reports.

The study looked at chromatin accessibility in 410 TCGA tumors in the context of broader genomic features to explore functional effects of regulatory features.

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The Wall Street Journal reports there is uncertainty surrounding whether He Jiankui's embryo editing did what he said it did.

Stat News reports that the pause on procuring fetal tissue for intramural US National Institutes of Health research will soon affect additional labs there.

Customers might want to consider what they might learn about their risk of diseases like Alzheimer's before snagging the genetic testing kits that are on many gift guides this year, NJ.com writes.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of the invasive fall webworm, amp of constrained coding regions within the human genome, and more.