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A team of Swedish researchers has received $3.3 million to develop a new nanotechnology platform for detecting blood-borne markers in lung and breast cancer.

Sweden's Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab, will offer subsidized whole-genome sequencing to scientists through two national research programs that it plans to fund with a total of about $3 million over the coming year.

Roche still plans to make its high-density peptide microarrays available to customers in the future.

This is part one of a two-part interview. Part two is available here.

Name: Peter Nilsson
Title: Platform Director, Affinity Proteomics, SciLifeLab, Stockholm

A team from the University of Gothenburg working with Life Technologies has published a technique combining reverse transcription and proximity ligation to allow quantitative PCR measurements of the DNA, RNA, and proteins from a single cell.

Name: Max Käller
Position: Manager of the Genomics Experimental Platform Facility, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden
Education: PhD, Sweden's Royal Institute of Technology

Although Roche plans to discontinue a number of its NimbleGen microarray product lines at the beginning of next year, it is currently developing high-density peptide microarrays, and has made them available to scientists from Sweden's SciLifeLab, BioArray News has learn

While many countries are cutting back on funding for life science research, Sweden is not one of them, as the Northern European country's Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt this week confirmed that his government intends to invest $320 million in life sciences over the next four ye

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A man has confessed to the rape and murder of developmental biologist Suzanne Eaton, according to the New York Times.

The Irish Times reports that US lawmakers and law enforcement agencies are concerned about ties between the US and Chinese genomics firms.

Parents of children with spinal muscular atrophy tell the Washington Post they are pushing to get insurance coverage of Novartis's Zolgensma.

In PNAS this week: gene mutations in individuals with syndromic craniosynostosis, putative colorectal cancer drivers, and more.