Sanger Institute

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: new CRISPR nuclease described, gut bacteria reference, and more.

Two research groups have cultured and sequenced microbes in fecal samples from healthy volunteers, producing new reference genomes for hundreds of species.

Two new studies found that prenatal whole-exome sequencing could uncover clinically significant variants in an additional 8 to 12 percent of fetuses with structural anomalies.

Researchers saw variants contributing to both ends of the weight spectrum by analyzing thousands of thin, early-onset obese, and population control individuals.

A number of the genes implicated are also the targets of approved therapeutics or of ones under testing.

Researchers identified immune activity changes in first-trimester placenta and decidua samples profiled through single-cell RNA sequencing.

The Darwin Tree of Life Project aims to sequence the genetic codes of 66,000 different species in the UK as part of the Earth BioGenome Project.

An investigation found no evidence of bullying or gender discrimination, but did find management flaws at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, the Guardian reports.

The researchers found that genes whose transcription in response to an immune challenge diverged across species also varied between single cells.

Researchers saw frequent somatic mutations in esophageal tissue from nine individuals, including mutations under positive selection in 14 oncogenes.

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NPR reports that researchers in Italy are testing a gene drive aimed at controlling mosquito populations.

Researchers may experience the effects of the government shutdown for a while, the Los Angeles Times reports.

A new study finds that the majority of patients at a Tijuana clinic received a diagnosis after first-line genome sequencing, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

In Genome Biology this week: post-transcriptional modification-based stratification of glioblastoma, single-cell analysis of gene expression and methylation in human iPSCs, and more.