Sanford-Burnham

Distinct alterations of the APP gene in Alzheimer's patients appear to depend on reverse transcriptase, suggesting HIV antiretroviral drugs as a potential new treatment.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: rise of copy-number variants during neurogenesis, genetic and phenotypic variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and more.

Using a new machine-learning approach, researchers from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute analyzed brain cells obtained from mice during neurogenesis.

The researchers identified 122 potential immune response drivers that could serve as targets for drug research efforts.

The money was provided by real estate developer and philanthropist Conrad Prebys and will be used to accelerate the delivery of new treatments to improve human health.

The partners will screen for molecules that could revive metabolic activity in heart tissue damaged by cardiovascular disease or failure.

Originally published Oct. 9.
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), molecules previously thought to play no role in cellular or disease development, may provide researchers a new avenue for developing a non-invasive diagnostic for prostate cancer.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The Broad Institute confirmed that it is laying off 27 employees as the National Institutes of Health stopped funding for a program, and the institute separately decided to refocus its therapeutic development efforts.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – While variants in the gene FTO have previously been associated with a propensity toward obesity, the University of Chicago's Marcelo Nóbrega and colleagues reported in Nature this week that those obesity-linked variants in FTO actually

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Sanford-Burhnam Medical research Institute said today it has received a grant from the US Department of the Air Force to use cell-based assays to study the potential toxicity of large collections of chemicals.

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The Washington Post reports on a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan to place rapid DNA analyzers at booking stations around the country.

In an editorial, officials from scientific societies in the US and China call for the international community to develop criteria and standards for human germline editing.

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

In Science this week: the PsychENCODE Consortium reports on the molecular mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders, and more.