Purdue University

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genomic investigation of maize's adaption to temperate climates, and more.

The method uses graphene-coated silica particles fused to complementary RNA to register impedance changes in the presence of viruses.

The system, developed in 2007 as an online portal to access hardware and software for automated metagenome analysis, has strained to meet user demand.

Researchers put together an almost 2-billion-base genome assembly for the deer tick, which can transmit pathogens causing Lyme disease and other conditions.

Array-based gene expression data suggests luminal and basal subtypes present in both human and canine forms of invasive urothelial carcinoma.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Metabolite-based diagnostic firm Matrix-Bio announced today it has signed an exclusive agreement with the Purdue Research Foundation to potentially develop cancer diagnostic tests based on Purdue University's technologies.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A group of life sciences companies operating in Indiana and local universities plan to use $50 million to launch a new institute that will pursue genetics and genomics-based research as well as a wide range of other projects addressing human diseases, the regional indu

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Purdue University has received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to develop technologies to alter epigenetic marks in the genome that turn genes on and off.

By Molika Ashford
A group from Intel's integrated biosystems lab is developing a label-free electrical detection method to detect DNA polymerase reactions on a chelator-modified field-effect transistor.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.