PGRN | GenomeWeb

PGRN

The Pharmacogenomics Clinical Annotation Tool interprets variants from sequencing or genotyping tests and generates a report to inform prescribing decisions.

NEWYORK (GenomeWeb) – Personalized medicine proponents have long argued that pharmacogenomics can increase drug efficacy and reduce dangerous adverse outcomes, especially if PGx information is collected and stored preemptively so that it can be available at the point of prescribing and useful in

An international research team, led by investigators at the Mayo Clinic and National Institutes of Health's Pharmacogenomics Research Network, has identified a set of SNPs with promise as a tool to guide more personalized preventive breast cancer therapy using selective estrogen

Starting this fall, researchers will use an online system developed by Sage Bionetworks to at once collaboratively share data and compete to develop a genetic predictor that can identify rheumatoid arthritis patients who are likely to respond to immunosuppressive anti-TNF therapi

"Looking at drug-response genetics and looking at disease genetics are very parallel processes," said Ron Krauss, senior scientist and director of atherosclerosis research at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute in California.

With the additional funding, "we are going to develop literature-mining tools to extract information automatically to speed up our curation," Russ Altman, principal investigator in PharmGKB, said this week. The added NIH funds will also be used to annotate the whole-genome sequence data of a family, which Altman cannot yet identify.

With this new funding, the NIH hopes to continue PGx research in existing focus areas of cancer, heart disease, asthma, and nicotine addiction, and also to expand into new areas, including rheumatoid arthritis and bipolar disorder.

Pacific Biosciences is hosting a competition in which researchers are vying to win free sequencing for an organism with the most interesting genome.

An opinion piece appearing in Newsday likens familial DNA searches to stop-and-frisk policies.

The San people of Africa have drawn up a code of conduct for researchers, according to the Conversation.

In Nature this week: genotypes linked to hip osteoarthritis, and more.