OHSU

This Week in Science

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

Seventy-eight percent of participants had at least one positive carrier screening result and 3.5 percent had a medically actionable secondary finding.

In an against-all-odds twist, a researcher studying exceeding rare FOXG1 mutations discovers her daughter has the syndrome.

The companies will use Ymir's urine extracellular vesicle technology and OHSU's Proteomics Shared Resource to develop biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

Retraction Watch reports that Nature has added an editor's note to a paper describing the correction of a pathogenic mutation in human embryos.

OHSU researchers will use Biological Dynamics' NanoVerita and ExoVerita lab-on-a-chip systems to develop early cancer detection methods.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: CRISPR/Cas9 used to correct a disease-causing mutation in embryos, and more.

Researchers have used the gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 to correct a mutation linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in embryos.

Embryos Edited in US

Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

The institute will join the NCI's Cancer Systems Biology Consortium, which is studying cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.

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Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.