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Consumer genomics companies have endeavored to reach out to minority communities with sometimes contentious results.

Common non-coding variants, along with rarer coding alterations, appear to contribute to a developmental disease with bowel and other gastrointestinal symptoms.

The machine-learning-based method identifies relationships between bacterial strains and tracks their movements in less time, using less memory than existing solutions. 

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: gypsy moth genome sequenced, phylogenomic analysis of Polyneopterans, and more.

Conflict Search

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

Statisticians are often asked by researchers to manipulate data, Bloomberg reports.

A pair of economists uses genetic attainment scores to examine the effect of parental income on the success of their children.

The teams, from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and NYU Langone Health, generated viable yeast strains with just one or two chromosomes.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: retrotransposon expression and regulation in human cells, convergent evolution in photoreceptor proteins, and more.

A study in Microbiome finds that heavy drinkers have an unhealthy mix of bacteria in their mouths.

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The Hill reports President Donald Trump issued an executive directing federal agencies to cut the number of board and advisory committees they have.

The New York Times reports that researchers are combining tools to more quickly develop crops to feed a growing population and cope with shifting climates.

Scientists in Canada are looking to the UK's plan to sequence children with rare conditions for inspiration, the National Post reports.

In PNAS this week: copy number changes arose during polar bear evolution, genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the Siberian hamster, and more.