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A new report examines increased threats to scientific independence in the US, the Guardian reports.

Maybe Screen for It

Biomarkers could some day be used to identify military personnel who might benefit from post-traumatic stress disorder treatment, Scientific American reports.

The NAM, NAS, and Royal Society have formed a commission to develop a framework on the proper use of genome editing, and convened its first meeting in Washington, DC, this week.

Consumer genomics companies have endeavored to reach out to minority communities with sometimes contentious results.

Common non-coding variants, along with rarer coding alterations, appear to contribute to a developmental disease with bowel and other gastrointestinal symptoms.

The machine-learning-based method identifies relationships between bacterial strains and tracks their movements in less time, using less memory than existing solutions. 

In PNAS this week: gypsy moth genome sequenced, phylogenomic analysis of Polyneopterans, and more.

Conflict Search

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

Statisticians are often asked by researchers to manipulate data, Bloomberg reports.

A pair of economists uses genetic attainment scores to examine the effect of parental income on the success of their children.

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Russian CRISPR researcher moves along with plans to ultimately alter the genes of embryos of deaf couples, though awaits regulatory approval, Nature News reports.

University of California, San Francisco, researchers have uncovered a gene mutations that appears to make a father-son duo more efficient sleepers.

NPR reports a large health insurer has begun to cover some pharmacogenetic tests for psychiatric drugs.

In PLOS this week: genome-wide association study of non-syndromic orofacial cleft subtypes, epigenetic and transcriptomic analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and more.