Close Menu

NYGC

The two papers published today in Science and Cell have implications for both forensics and genetic research.

Initiated the by New York Genome Center Cancer Group, the Polyethnic-1000 project will focus on cancer patients from ethnic minority groups.

A study found that cis-regulatory variation modifies the penetrance of coding variants, and that variants' regulatory haplotype configuration affects disease risk.

The New York Genome Center created MetroNome as a way to show genomic data in the context of phenotypes, but integration challenges lie ahead.

The funding from the Mark Foundation for Cancer Research will support an initiative to investigate cancer genomics in ethnically diverse populations.

Researchers at the annual Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities meeting said they are joining single-cell sequencing to other single-cell analyses.

Lancet, developed by the New York Genome Center, uses colored de Bruijn graphs to jointly analyze tumor and normal reads.

Using exome sequence and questionnaire data, researchers saw links between motor skills and likely gene disruptive or missense de novo mutations.

Using a portable DNA sequencer and a Bayesian algorithm, researchers reported being able to reidentify humans from DNA within minutes of sequencing.

The group has filed a patent on the method and is interested in teaming up with an industry partner to commercialize it. 

Pages

Researchers tie a variant in ADAMTS3 to breathing difficulties in dissimilar dog breeds, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

The Japan Times reports that researchers sequenced the genome of a woman who lived during the Jomon period.

Parents of children with rare genetic disease have to contend with shifts in the interpretation of genetic variants, the Wall Street Journal reports.

In Science this week: single-nucleus RNA sequencing of brain tissue from individuals with autism, and more.