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Over the next year or so, the investigators plan to sequence the genomes of 3,000 patients with cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or neurological disorders.

The screen homed in on a number of genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis that, when lost, make cells more resistant to infection.

Researchers found complex "rigma," "pyrgo," and "tyfona" structural variant classes by applying their new algorithm to thousands of cancer genomes.

The New York Times reports the New York Genome Center has awarded six grants to researchers to study cancer in diverse populations.

The GTEx Consortium, which has been working for 10 years, analyzed how genetic variants affect gene regulation, and how this contributes to disease and traits.

The funding is being provided under the NYGC's Polyethnic-1000 initiative, which was launched in 2018 to study cancer care inequities in underserved populations.

The Washington Post reports on researchers' efforts to determine the effect of an increasingly common SARS-CoV-2 mutation.

The company is commercializing a genome-wide sequencing method called MRDetect, developed by researchers at the New York Genome Center and Weill Cornell Medicine. 

In Nature this week: new Sperm-seq method enables crossover analysis, tumor-informed detection approach for minimal residual disease, and more.

With $2.5 million in initial philanthropy funding, the consortium plans to launch several research projects and establish a data commons for storing and sharing results. 

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Politico notes that the Biden Administration has not yet nominated a permanent Food and Drug Administration commissioner. 

Anthony Fauci also informed the World Health Organization executive board that the US would be joining the COVAX initiative, according to CNBC.

A new preprint suggests some SARS-CoV-2 variants could affect the effectiveness of current vaccines, the Associated Press reports.

In Nature this week: Australian lungfish provides details on the movement of vertebrate life from water to land, and more.