NYGC

While the New York Genome Center says whole-genome cancer sequencing is the future, companies already offering such tests are struggling to get paid.

The funding is being provided to a number of early-career investigators and collaborative research groups using genomics and other technologies.

The companies will offer BGI's DNBseq next-generation sequencing technology along with Gencove's ImputeSeq low-pass sequencing analysis pipeline.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: open genetic genealogy databases can lead to the identification of individuals who have not sought testing, and more.

The two papers published today in Science and Cell have implications for both forensics and genetic research.

Initiated the by New York Genome Center Cancer Group, the Polyethnic-1000 project will focus on cancer patients from ethnic minority groups.

A study found that cis-regulatory variation modifies the penetrance of coding variants, and that variants' regulatory haplotype configuration affects disease risk.

The New York Genome Center created MetroNome as a way to show genomic data in the context of phenotypes, but integration challenges lie ahead.

The funding from the Mark Foundation for Cancer Research will support an initiative to investigate cancer genomics in ethnically diverse populations.

Researchers at the annual Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities meeting said they are joining single-cell sequencing to other single-cell analyses.

Pages

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.