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This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: computational approach to bring together single-cell data, systems genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae polymorphism, and more.

Anopholes stephensi

An international team sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 16 Anopholes mosquito species to unravel evolutionary relationships and adaptations offering hints to malaria parasite transmission.

Transposagen's expanded license with the University of Notre Dame, University of Florida, and the USDA will cover nearly all commercial applications, including as a tool for drug and biomarker discovery.

Under the Phenotypic Drug Discovery program, researchers from academia or biotech submit candidate compounds in specific therapeutic areas for Lilly to evaluate and profile. Participating organizations retain full IP rights to the compounds, but Lilly receives first rights to negotiate a broader collaboration or licensing agreement.

Eli Lilly, Cornell University, and the Kauffman Foundation's iBridge Network each unveiled web-based initiatives for facilitating tech transfer at last week's Association of University Technology Managers annual meeting.

Bloomberg reports that the DNA-for-cash deal reported in Kentucky might be a more widespread scam.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have treated infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using gene therapy in an early phase study.

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

In Nature this week: a genomic analysis of the snailfish Pseudoliparis swirei, ancient DNA analysis gives insight into the introduction of farming to England, and more.