NIST | GenomeWeb

NIST

The public-private consortium, led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, recently released four new reference materials.

The material has a similar benefit to graphene, in that it is one-atom thin, but has the benefit that DNA does not stick to it as it translocates through the pore. 

The firm will provide DNA from at least 50 mouse cell lines for use in a PCR-based validation assay.

The partners have signed a three-year R&D agreement under which SeraCare will provide its ctDNA reference materials to NIST for comparison between labs.

The researchers found that many clinically relevant genes fall in regions of the genome that cannot be confidently sequenced and analyzed. 

Dozens of government agencies, academic institutions, and a various public and private sector organizations have now committed to driving the initiative forward.

The researchers propose attaching nucleobases to graphene nanopores in order to use the electrical and strain properties of graphene to read DNA.

Researchers tested a combination of three aligners and four variant callers on reference datasets, finding that each has its own biases. 

The firm discussed its technology, the NIST data, and data from some early customers in a webinar it hosted this week.

An explosion last weekend at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology has been tentatively linked to meth production.

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In PLOS this week: genetic study of breast cancer in Egyptian families, mutations linked to cleft lip and palate, and more.

Council Bluffs, Iowa, schools are encouraging more girls to pursue STEM courses, according to the Associated Press.

Because of new open-access requirements, Gates Foundation-funded researchers can't publish in some top journals, Nature News reports.

In Science this week: deletion of one microRNA allows pluripotent stem cells to form embryonic and non-embryonic lineages, and more.