NHS

New Plan

National Health Service England has a new 10-year plan that includes the expansion of genetic testing, according to New Scientist.

Duty to Tell?

A UK woman sues a hospital for not telling her of her father's genetic testing results, the Guardian reports.

The NHS will expand on existing efforts such as the 100,000 Genomes Project and will offer people with rare diseases the opportunity to sequence their genomes.

Making It Routine

The Guardian reports that England's National Health Service is to offer routine genomic medicine starting in October.

The £550,000 award is part of a larger multi-partner grant to develop and implement a point-of-care test to avoid antibiotic-related hearing loss in newborns.

Issues to Overcome

A new report outlines issues facing the implementation of personalized medicine in the UK, the Independent reports.

Although a draft guidance last month recommended against use of molecular tests to guide chemotherapy, the group's finalized decision is subject to price negotiation and other adjustments.

An assessment concluded that Oncotype Dx has not demonstrated a significant enough impact on outcomes or cost effectiveness compared to current practice.

The device is expected to be used with Genedrive's hepatitis C virus assay, which recently received CE-IVD marking.

As of this week, the project had sequenced 39,500 genomes and returned reports for about 3,000 rare disease families and more than 600 cancer patients.

Pages

Germany's Project DEAL has come to an agreement with the publisher Wiley over journal access and open-access publishing, ScienceInsider reports.

Researchers uncover additional loci associated with lifespan, which the Telegraph says could be folded into a genetic test.

A Canadian panel recommends public coverage of the gene therapy Kymriah if its cost comes down, the Globe and Mail reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: new accurate quantification by sequencing approach, CNV breakpoints in Plasmodium falciparum, and more.