NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The National Center for Genome Resources and the life sciences software company Simbiot said today they have partnered to launch a new genomic informatics company called Lumenogix.

The National Center for Genome Resources has become a certified service provider for target enrichment services using Agilent Technologies' SureSelect technology, Agilent said last week.

By Monica Heger
2011 will likely be recognized as the year that genome sequencing broke out of the research realm and moved into the clinic.

As part of a five-year, $40 million project to develop petroleum alternatives, the National Center for Genome Resources will sequence plants and trees being considered for use as biomass-based fuel for the aviation industry.

People in the News


Darrell Dinwiddie, Neil Miller

“As a company with a focus on plant breeding, we are happy to collaborate with partners that can promote our technologies in their broader networks,” said Mark van Haaren, KeyGene’s vice president of business development.

NCGR will use the ag-biotech company's Whole Genome Profiling technology to offer sequence-based mapping projects.

Last week, the National Center for Genome Resources reported the results of a clinical trial for a carrier screening test for more than 400 pediatric diseases, while the Chinese University of Hong Kong reported the results of a trial involving a fetal trisomy 21 test.


An opinion piece in the Guardian argues that President Donald Trump is uninterested in science and that might not be a bad thing for the field.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports the Veterans Affairs Health System is studying whether genetic testing can help prescribe better depression therapies.

Stat News reports that Spark Therapeutics' Luxturna is now being used to treat a wider array of patients.

In Genome Biology this week: transcription factor use among brittle stars, single-cell RNA sequencing strategy, and more.