Nationwide Children's Hospital

A decade after their team at WashU sequenced the first tumor-normal genome pair, Mardis and Wilson are bringing cancer genomics to the clinic at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

With computing infrastructure in place, Nationwide Children's Hospital's Institute for Genomic Medicine is giving clinicians new tools for diagnosis and treatment.

Despite years of experience of returning genetic test results, clinicians and researchers are still faced with many questions, such as what to do about VUS and secondary findings.

The donation will support research at the Institute of Genomic Medicine, as well as research efforts in heart health, neonatology, and injury prevention.

The platform features a more comprehensive list of pipelines, simplifies data movement and flow, and reduces analysis times.

Richard Wilson and Elaine Mardis plan to use comprehensive sequencing to transition genomic discoveries into clinical assays for pediatric cancer and germline disorders.

Elaine Mardis, Richard Wilson

The recruitment of Rick Wilson and Elaine Mardis from Washington University in St. Louis was made possible by a new $10 million gift from the Nationwide Foundation.

The team has been monitoring changes in host gene expression patterns due to different types of infections, and hopes to develop a diagnostic test.

The funding will support work identifying the mechanisms underlying the differential responses among pediatric and adult ALL patients to therapy.

The gift to the Nationwide Pediatric Innovation Fund at Nationwide Children's Hospital will primarily help the genomics research center acquire new equipment.

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