National Geographic | GenomeWeb

National Geographic

The company has developed a suite of initial products focused on ancestry that will compete with offerings from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA.

Living DNA can break down the origins of a customer’s ancestry into 21 distinct regions within Britain alone, as well as across 80 different worldwide populations.

Bella

Embark hopes the test will not only satisfy the curiosity of pet owners but advance both canine and human health research.

Thanks to a new array, NatGeo will now offer customers expanded Y chromosome and mtDNA analyses, setting it apart in a competitive consumer genomics market.

The value of consumer genomics services is increasing as customers seek to discover new cousins and adoptees track down their biological birth parents.

The term 'consumer genomics' may have a catch-all ring to it, but for the time being it means ancestry testing and genetic genealogy, including for companies such as 23andMe, which built its business on relaying both personal health information and ancestral information back to c

RootsTech is a family history conference held each year in Salt Lake City.

Name: Spencer Wells Title: Director of National Geographic's Genographic Project

The consumer genomics market is often thought to be dominated by a handful of American players, but across the Atlantic, a UK-based company called ScotlandsDNA is specifically courting British and Irish customers.

When 23andMe decided to stop offering health-related tests to new customers in early December, it may have created a 2014 consumer genomics market environment defined by what company can provide the best ancestry testing and genetic genealogy experience to its customers.

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An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Research funding in Canada is to remain mostly the same, ScienceInsider reports.

In Science this week: random DNA replication errors play role in cancer, and more.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarks on an open-access publishing path.