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The company, which is developing instrument-free, low-cost molecular diagnostics platform for infectious disease testing, plans to float its shares on the Nasdaq.

Buoyed by a string of positive news, the San Diego firm's stock was up 22 percent in Friday afternoon trading and 80 percent from last week.

Growth was driven by demand in its life science segment, particularly for COVID-19-related products, while the diagnostics segment saw uneven improvement.

The Seattle-based genomics technology firm said it intends to use the funds for working capital and general corporate purposes.

The firm is offering an additional 500,000 shares of Class A stock, bringing the total to 4 million shares, offered at $110 per share.

The company's stock will now trade on a split-adjusted basis on the Nasdaq after authorization for the split was approved by stockholders.

The cell analysis firm, which went public in July, saw service revenues fall 63 percent, offset by 17 percent growth in product revenues.

The Emeryville, California-based instrument maker expects to raise $178.2 million after offering 8.1 million shares at $22 per share.

The coverage comes after the women's health diagnostics firm went public last month, seeking up to $100 million in the offering.

The company sells a number of next-generation sequencing-based tissue and liquid biopsy tests for cancer therapy selection to the Chinese market.

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The Wall Street Journal reports on gaps in COVID-19 testing affecting less affluent urban areas and rural locations.

According to NBC News, new SARS-CoV-2 variants are making it harder for researchers to model the course of the pandemic.

The New York Times reports that experts say President Joe Biden's goal of vaccinating 1 million people a day in the US in the next 100 days is too low a bar.

In Science this week: single-cell lineage tracing technique applied to study lung cancer metastasis, and more.