Nasdaq

The company had been warned in March that it failed to meet a listing requirement calling for a minimum $1 per share closing price of its common stock.

The company is taking the step to continue listing its shares on the Nasdaq, which had warned OpGen that did not meet a listing requirement calling for a minimum bid price of $1 per share. 

Investors in Exact Sciences went on a selling spree after CellMax publicized data suggesting its test could outperform Cologuard for the early detection of colorectal cancer.

The company's stock faced delisting for trading below $1 for 30 consecutive business days in violation of the Nasdaq's requirements.

OpGen had previously been warned by Nasdaq that it failed to meet listing requirements. Last week, the firm was told that it was ineligible for an extension to regain compliance.

Last month, the company was notified that it no longer met the Nasdaq's stockholder equity listing requirement and faced delisting.

Earlier this year, Rosetta effected a 1-for-12 reverse stock split after failing to meet the Nasdaq's $1 minimum bid price requirement.

The molecular diagnostics firm was told on Wednesday that it is again in compliance with a rule calling for a $1 minimum bid on its share price.

The firm's market value fell below the minimum $35 million level to remain listed on the Nasdaq. HTG has until Jan 29, 2018 to regain compliance. 

Nasdaq told the firm on Tuesday that its shares failed to maintain a minimum bid price of $1 per share for at least 30 consecutive trading days.

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This year's Breakthrough Prize winners include a pair that developed a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy.

The New York Times reports on how white supremacists misconstrue genetic research, concerning many geneticists.

Researchers find that people's genetics influence their success at university, but that it is not the only factor.

In Nature this week: approach to identify genetic variants that affect trait variability, application of read clouds to microbiome samples, and more.