MRC

Aaron Klug Dies

Aaron Klug, who won the Nobel Prize for his work on creating three-dimensional images of biological molecules, has died, the New York Times reports.

California Institute of Technology's Frances Arnold was awarded half this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry, while the University of Missouri's George Smith and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology's Gregory Winter will split the other half.

The funding will support the university's MRC Human Genetics Unit, which is investigating the genetic underpinnings of human health and disease.

Alcohol's Gene Damage

Ethanol can damage the genes of hematopoietic stem cells, potentially showing how alcohol consumption can lead to cancer, the Guardian reports.

The partners are working together to advance research into the role of epigenetics in respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

A group of organizations in the UK say that there needs to be discussions about the use of technologies such as CRISPR/Cas-9 for human germline editing.

The six universities will collaborate with industry and clinicians to develop tools for stratifying patients based on their response to certain therapies.

Taking advantage of a natural experiment, researchers found that methylation levels at the tumor suppressor VTRNA2-1 gene in infants vary with mothers' diet at conception.

Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council are providing £5 million to establish the S-CORT Consortium to investigate bowel cancer biology. 

The consortium currently has phenotype data for more than 1,100 mouse knockout strains and hopes to have as many as 5,000 by next year

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A genome-wide association study highlights a potential role for hair follicles in acne risk, according to New Scientist.

Newsday reports that breast cancer genetic testing guidelines for are out of date and may miss individuals.

In Cell this week: gene editing-based strategy to screen for immune system regulators, ancient plague patterns, and more.

Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.