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The USPTO said that since the co-assignees of the Tuschl-I IP “have divergent interests, no one side can reasonably expect or be permitted to control the prosecution of [the] patent application [at issue] to the exclusion of the others.”

The court determined that Alnylam and Max Planck have “not shown a substantial likelihood of success” on the merits of their case.

UMass further argued in its counterclaim that a key aspect of the disputed RNAi technology — the 3’ overhangs commonly incorporated into siRNAs — was an inherent feature of the RNAi molecules described in a patent application filed prior to another patent application from Max Planck that specifically claims the overhangs.

Using an siRNA screen, a team of researchers from Boston and Maryland has identified a host of human proteins that appear to play a role in hepatitis C infection.

The plaintiffs' counsel also provided some background on the legal dispute, including details of an early-2004 meeting between the chief executives of Alnylam and rival Sirna Therapeutics that led up to the litigation.

Additional court documents filed by Alnylam and Max Planck indicate that the inclusion of 3' overhang data in Tuschl-I patent applications is a primary issue in the legal dispute.

In doing so, the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Massachusetts have all asked that the court reject Alnylam Pharmaceuticals and Max Planck's request for an order blocking any Tuschl-I patent issuance.

The lawsuit alleges that the defendants have sought to include in their patent applications inventions that belong solely to Max Planck and licensed exclusively to Alnylam. While licenses to the IP have been a big moneymaker for Alnylam, some companies have begun looking to alternative RNAi technologies.

According to court documents, the defendants have allegedly misappropriated and misrepresented as their own inventions solely owned by Max Planck and exclusively licensed by Alnylam.

Taris is the latest MIT spinout to attract significant VC cash after receiving early-stage proof-of-concept funding from the school's Deshpande Center, further highlighting the center's ability to speed commercialization of MIT biomedical research.

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A tissue sample from the 1960s harbors a near-complete sample of HIV, IFLScience reports.

A new bill would reshape the US National Science Foundation to include a focus on technological development, according to Science.

The Food and Drug Administration's decision to halt a SARS-CoV-2 study has drawn criticism, according to Stat News.

In Genome Biology this week: features affecting gut microbiome and parasite patterns, cellular interactions in lung tumor microenvironment, and more.